Nik Wallenda crosses the Grand Canyon on a tightrope with NO safety harness

Daredevil Nik Wallenda has completed a breath-taking tightrope walk that took him a quarter mile over the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona.  Wallenda performed the stunt late on Sunday on a 2-inch-thick steel cable, 1,500 feet above the river on the Navajo Nation near the Grand Canyon.

He took just more than 22 minutes, pausing and crouching twice as winds whipped around him and the rope swayed.   ‘Thank you Lord. Thank you for calming that cable, God,’ he said about 13 minutes into the walk.

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Breath-taking: Nik Wallenda succeeded in crossing the Little Colorado River Gorge in Arizona on Sunday nightBreath-taking: Nik Wallenda succeeded in crossing the Little Colorado River Gorge in Arizona on Sunday night

Breath-taking: Nik Wallenda succeeded in crossing the Little Colorado River Gorge in Arizona on Sunday nightBreath-taking: Nik Wallenda succeeded in crossing the Little Colorado River Gorge in Arizona on Sunday night
Easy does it: Wallenda gives a thumbs-up sign as he nears the end of the rope and kneels for a short breakEasy does it: Wallenda gives a thumbs-up sign as he nears the end of the rope and kneels for a short break

 Balancing act: Wallenda is the first person ever to attempt walking across the Grand Canyon on a tightrope Balancing act: Wallenda is the first person ever to attempt walking across the Grand Canyon on a tightrope

Wallenda didn’t wear a harness and stepped slowly and steady throughout, murmuring prayers to Jesus almost constantly along the way. He jogged and hopped the last few steps.

Winds blowing across the gorge had been expected to be around 30 mph. Wallenda told Discovery after the walk that the winds were at times ‘unpredictable’ and that dust had accumulated on his contact lenses. ‘It was way more windy, and it took every bit of me to stay focused the entire time,’ he said

The 34-year-old Wallenda is a seventh-generation high-wire artist and is part of the famous ‘Flying Wallendas’ circus family – a clan that is no stranger to death-defying feats.

About 600 spectators watching on a large video screen on site cheered him on as he walked toward them. A Navajo Nation ranger, a paramedic and two members of a film crew were stationed on the canyon floor and watched from below.

Rock steady: The aerial walker Nik Wallenda makes his way across on the quarter-mile journey
Rock steady: The aerial walker Nik Wallenda makes his way across on the quarter-mile journey
Risky business: Wallenda comes from a long line of tightrope walkers. His father speaks to him through an ear piece as he walksRisky business: Wallenda comes from a long line of tightrope walkers. His father speaks to him through an ear piece as he walks

Man on the wire: Wallenda's stunt was broadcast with a ten-second delay on the Discovery Channel Man on the wire: Wallenda’s stunt was broadcast with a ten-second delay on the Discovery Channel

Almost there! Wallenda managed to run the last few feet of his tightrope walk over the Grand Canyon which was broadcast live on TV

Almost there! Wallenda managed to run the last few feet of his tightrope walk over the Grand Canyon which was broadcast live on TV

Relief: Wallenda, left, is welcomed by his wife Erendira who watched his walk with their two children (pictured)Relief: Wallenda, left, is welcomed by his wife Erendira who watched his walk with their two children (pictured)
Although the distance he will have to walk is a little shorter ¿ 1,400ft compared to 1,800ft ¿ every inch of the way will have a crucial difference
Although the distance he will have to walk is a little shorter ¿ 1,400ft compared to 1,800ft ¿ every inch of the way will have a crucial difference 

 



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